prague spring


10/9/1968-Prague, Czechoslovakia- Portraits of Czechoslovakian President Ludvig Svoboda (left) and Czech Communist party leader Alexander Dubcek are here displayed in a Pargue shop window. The Communist Party leadership recently stressed that the dominant feature of political, military and economic life of the country must be the alliance with the Soviet Union

Soviet Tanks Roll Down Prague Street 1968

23/1968-Prague, Czechoslovakia-: Prague citizens gather around two burned-out buses, used as barricades near the radio station, while a Soviet tank guards the street corner August 21st

Destroyed cars and burnt tramways in the center of Prague

Czech youngsters holding Czechoslovak flag stand atop an overturned truck as other Prague residents surround Soviet tanks as the Soviet-led invasion by the Warsaw Pact armies crushed the so called Prague Spring reform in former Czechoslovakia

Prague, Czechoslovakia: Czechs jeer a Soviet tank here as invading troops from the U.S.S.R. and four allied nations overthrew the liberal government. Defiant Czechs abandoned any major attempt to resist the takeover by force of arms. The occupation forces seized the nations reform leaders

German troops march into the Hradcany Castle during the occupation of Prague and the dissolution of Czechoslovakia, while German sympathizers salute the troops. March 23, 1939

Czech women weep as they stand in vigil near Wenceslas Monument where a memorial has been set up honoring the first victim of the Soviet occupation, a 14-year-old boy. The youngster was reportedly was killed by a Soviet tank on the day occupation troops arrived in Prague

5/5/1949-Prague, Czechoslovakia- Armed with rifles, men, women and boys attached to the Worker’s Guard join in huge May Day parade in this Communist-dominated city. Carried behind the militant workers is a large portrait of Dolores Ibarruri, famed as “La Passionaria” during Spain’s civil war days

5/18/1968-Prague, Czechoslovakia- Among the many slogans carried during Prague’s May Day celebrations were such unusual ones as “Don’t Count Your Chickens Until They’re Hatched,” “We Want an Opposition Party,” and “Higher Salaries for Intellectuals.”







































































































































































5 responses

  1. juan

    INTENSE!!!!

    Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 17:14

  2. darinka

    nice work paul! this re-lit a fierce sense of pride in me. sorry i never translated that dubcek speech for you, i still have the window open as a to-do. one of the poster’s (the circus one) has novotny on it! also, there is a type in the opening blurb. did you look up the translations to the posters? some pretty powerful stuff. i linked my parents to this, but they’re out of town so they won’t get a chance to czech it out til the end of the month, but i’m sure they will be interested. have you seen ‘the unbearable lightness of being’? it has a crazy scene which mixes footage from the invasion in with film footage. they had to smuggle the footy to other countries, who would then release it to the world. you should check out the film in its entirety (and the book!!), but here is the scene http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1wcrIHYVmE

    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 at 10:03

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